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The positive benefits of seeing a therapist are endless. Bettering your emotional health can help you grow as a person, become physically healthier, lead toward a more fulfilling career and improve your romantic relationship....
Should you see a therapist?
The positive benefits of seeing a therapist are endless. Bettering your emotional health can help you grow as a person, become physically healthier, lead toward a more fulfilling career and improve your romantic relationship. Often, people don't make an appointment because they fear there's a stigma attached or they aren't sure it's what they need. Sometimes people think "it isn't that bad" or "it'll go away," and try to move forward without help.

First, you should know there's never a wrong time to see a therapist. In fact, even if you aren't sure it's right for you, it doesn't hurt to go and find out. It's just like a check up with your physician to make sure everything's in working order. Second, you should consider if you have any symptoms that indicate you need help.

Signs that therapy is the right step:

  • You're having trouble getting through your normal daily activities - like getting out of bed, making food, going to school or work, talking with friends and family - then you should seek help, PsychCentral advised. Any distress that interferes with your ability to function should be addressed with a medical professional.
  • You've stopped being interested in things you used to love to do or you feel generally disconnected from the world.
  • You notice you've become dependent on a substance or person to make yourself feel better, Psychology Today said. It can be alcohol, cigarettes, hard drugs or even your significant other. If you feel you can't perform daily tasks or cope with it or them, you should talk with a therapist.
  • You're experience physical symptoms of your distress such as a change in appetite, weight or sleep. Other physical signs are headaches, an increased heart rate, stomachaches and intense sweating.
  • You become angry or irritable quickly, even to the point of wanting to or becoming physically aggressive.
  • You think and talk badly about yourself. Negative self-talk is like poisoning your own mental well by thinking things like "I'm not good enough" or "I don't deserve being happy."
  • Someone close to you had noticed a change in your behavior and has asked if you're OK.
  • You've experienced a traumatic event such as abuse or an illness, or you've lost someone close to you.
It isn't easy to admit you need help. But if you're physically hurt, you'd go to the emergency room or your physician. When you're mentally hurting, you should do the same. You have just as much of a right to be mentally and emotionally healthy as you do physically well.