DrConnections
A vibrant interdependence with others results in social wellness and creates healthy minds and bodies. Harmony in relationships contributes to decreased stress and symptoms, not to mention improved mental focus and peace of mind. Dysfunctional social health leads to higher risks in physical health conditions and an increased death rate....
July: Social Wellness Month by Kathy Carlton Willis

Become Healthier Through Relationships

A vibrant interdependence with others results in social wellness and creates healthy minds and bodies. Harmony in relationships contributes to decreased stress and symptoms, not to mention improved mental focus and peace of mind. Dysfunctional social health leads to higher risks in physical health conditions and an increased death rate.

Check your social wellness. Determine your strengths, and which areas need work:
  • I notice the needs of others and help in some way (financial, time, labor, etc.).
  • I volunteer my time and resources for good causes.
  • I’m a responsible member of the community.
  • I have an open circle of friends, with room for more.
  • I enjoy a diverse array of friends – all ages and races.
  • I help family members and neighbors.
  • I am genuine in my communication with others.
  • I am a good listener and ask sincere questions.
  • I show compassion to those who are hurting and have suffered loss.

When we find our significance in life, and are able to contribute to the wholeness of others, we discover true fulfillment. Individual strengths feed in to the strengths of the whole.

Communication and interaction are essential for connectivity. Work and leisure time are enhanced by social activities and relationships. In today’s busy world of multitasking, it takes discipline to schedule time for meaningful social interaction.

“We are in an age where wellness is given much lip service but often little direction or encouragement,” said Sami Rahman, a registered nurse with a master’s degree and Simulations Director at Blinn College in Texas. “Social wellness is as vital to our being as our organs. When we allow ourselves to contribute to the common welfare of our communities instead of focusing on self, we are refreshed, encouraged and typically have little time for conflict or disharmony.” Rahman adds that her spiritual health and communication skills were vital in establishing meaningful relationships based on mutual respect.

Final social wellness tips:
  • Focus on the needs of others rather than on self-needs.
  • Resolve conflicts quickly and completely.
  • Contribute to the care of the community and the welfare of its residents.

Kathy Carlton Willis is a publicist, writer, editor and coach who works with authors and speakers nationwide. Kathy and her husband Russ live in Brenham, TX.